News & Publication Sandya Institute Opens Refugee Learning Center in Jakarta

Sandya Institute Opens Refugee Learning Center in Jakarta

Posted By Sandya Institute On Thursday, 1 March 2018
Minorities in Indonesia continue to face discriminatory regulations and violent attacks! They need our help! Help us fighting injustice!

Minorities in Indonesia continue to face discriminatory regulations and violent attacks! They need our help! Help us fighting injustice!

During the recent years, the world is experiencing what is known as the global refugee crises. Based on the data from United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), in the year of 2014 there was 60 million refugees and internally displaced people (IDP) in the whole world. One of the main cause which highly increase the flow of migrants and refugees nowadays is the conflict in countries such as Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Congo, Eritrea, poverty in Kosovo, etc.

One of the country which accept a lot of refugee but doesn’t ratify the Refugee Convention 1951 is Indonesia. Indonesia has been considered as a transit country for the asylum seekers. A lot of refugees come to Indonesia to get a refugee status and wait to be moved to a third country such as Australia. However, as a matter of fact, a lot of refugees also have to deal with the uncertainty of that status so they have to wait. During their waiting, they can’t always do the daily activity like normal people do and some of their basic rights can’t also be fulfilled.

According to the data in UNHCR (February 2016), there was 13.829 refugees and asylum seekers in Indonesia. Those refugees come from Afghanistan, Myanmar, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Iran, Palestina, Pakistan, Irak, and many others. There are 2.445 people identified who need a certain help and there was 3.114 interviews that was done individually to determine whether or not someone is worthy to get a refugee status. There was 3.216 individuals whose refugee status is finalized, but only 636 refugees who succeeded in being placed in third country and to resettle there. This showcases that a lot of asylum seekers or refugees who are stuck in Indonesia and live barely, without being able to obtain the rights of individuals under the law. They couldn’t work and get a formal education. Although, with or without refugee status they are still human beings who have the rights for education and a proper way of living.

Based on the situation, Sandya Institute as a non-governmental organization which focuses on peacebuilding and human rights advocacy has an intention to help refugees in Indonesia in obtaining their rights for education by building a refugee learning center. This program was initiated by Sandya Institute Refugee Community in Jakarta. It has become our intention to give an education and make the lives of the refugees and asylum seekers become better in the midst of the limitations. The activity will take Place at DKN Garda Bangsa, Jalan Tebet Barat VIII, No. 56 B, RT 05/RW 04,  the time is 9AM – 1 PM, Monday to Friday, September-November 2017. It will be divided into 4 (four) classes :

1. Bahasa Indonesia Classes

In this session, refugees are going to be taught Bahasa Indonesia, so they will focus on their conversational ability that will also help the refugees in communicating throughout their daily lives.

2. English Language Classes

In this session, refugees are going to be taught English, so they will focus on their conversational ability that will also help the refugees in communicating throughout their daily lives. This will become very useful especially when the refugees will be resettled to a third country

3. Computer Class

In this session, refugees are going to be taught on basic computer skills. Basic computer skills is needed to access information through the internet and also to operate some software which will be useful for them when they will be able to work after they are resettled.

4. Legal Knowledge

The goal of this session is to give a basic legal knowledge especially about the rights of refugees according to the law, seeing that not a lot of refugees have known about their rights. Refugees also don’t know a lot about the law in Indonesia. Therefore, we intend to improve their knowledge on their rights as refugees in Indonesia. In this session, we also hope to give a brief description on the refugee status determination and how it is conducted.


Public Relations Team

Sandya Institute